East Side History Madison’s Blog

By and for the East Side History Club, a project of the Goodman Community Center

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Coming in Summer 2017: The Second Edition of “An East Side Album”!

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on June 13, 2017

We’re getting really close! The updated, expanded Second Edition of An East Side Album: A Community Remembers by the East Side History Club will be available for sale in Summer of 2017.

The original East Side Album was very well received and sold out quickly. Ever since, people have been asking us to either reprint it or publish a new edition. We thank you all for your contributions and your patience during the long “hatching” process. This second edition follows the same outline as the first edition. We have edited the material that was in the first edition and added a great deal of new material.

To be sure you are invited* to the book launch party this summer please leave your email or mailing address (whichever way you prefer to be notified) in the “Comments” section of this post.

  • Sarah White and Ann Waidelich

*If you already receive East Side History Club messages by email or postcard, you are already on the list.

 

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April 8 Meeting: Picturing the Past and Present: The Schenk-Atwood Neighborhood

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on March 30, 2017

Photo courtesy of “Turkeys of Madison” Facebook Group via Gretta Wing Miller

The East  Side History Club presents:

Picturing the Past and Present:
The Schenk- Atwood Neighborhood

Saturday, April 8*
1-3 pm
Evjue Room
Goodman Center,
149 Waubesa St.
$2 suggested donation

For our last East Side History Club program, historical consultant Ann Waidelich will present a virtual stroll through time on the near east side. Bring a snack to share. There will be time to reminisce about the club and the neighborhood.

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“Storytelling Inspired by Family Heirlooms”–A Story

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on March 22, 2017

At our March meeting Judith Porter, Superintendent of Antique Judging at the McHenry Co. Fair, shared the stories behind many of the treasure trove of objects she brought. “All of these objects are back in the neighborhood they come from,” she said, with obvious delight. Her talk revealed the rich interplay between genealogy, family history, and the stories that go with our stuff.  She ended with a call to action: “Journal! Write about your life, for your children and grandchildren. And for goodness’ sake, label your photographs!”

After Judith’s presentation, several attendees shared stories of objects they had brought with them, either actual mementos or photos.

Carol Walker shared her story of the first guests in her new home.  Carol and her husband, Richard, bought the house at 110 N. Fair Oaks Ave. in 1993.  It was built in 1948. Her parents, brother, nephew and friend had Sunday dinner on May 30th with Carol and Richard, dining at two card tables in the second bedroom which they converted into a dining room.

110 N. Fair Oaks Avenue

Carol also shared the story of caring for the white oak tree in the front yard. (Yes, even a tree can be a treasured family heirloom.) She recently hired an arborist to judiciously trim the tree, which she estimates is 130-140 years old, to keep it healthy. With the loss of so many mature canopy trees on the east side, we applaud our neighbors who, like Carol, help preserve our elderly arboreal friends!

Carol likes to think that the stand of oaks near her home might have inspired the choice of “Village of Fair Oaks” that was the area’s original name from 1906 to 1912. (Another possible origin for the name comes from one of the men who promoted the Village idea, who was wounded at the 1862 Civil War battle site called Fair Oaks in Virginia.)

Carol Walker with her husband Richard, who died three years ago.

 

 

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Join the inaugural Season of Madison’s only Vintage Base Ball Club

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on March 17, 2017

Your East Side History Club organizers are please that Mike Gibson contacted us about his mission to start a vintage ball club in Madison!

Here’s his note–

Hello, I am starting up a vintage baseball club in Madison.  We are called the Capitol City Base Ball Club, named after the baseball team that played here in the 1860s.  We will play other vintage baseball teams in the area.  We are currently recruiting players and I am hoping you can share our flyer with any of your people that might be interested in joining.  You can also share our facebook page, at facebook.com/madisoncapcities  Thanks for your help! – Mike”

Mike sent us this flyer. Please share it with anyone you know who might want to join, or help spread the word! Just right-click on the image to download and print copies, or share a link to this page.

  • Sarah White and Ann Waidelich

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March 18 Meeting: Storytelling Inspired by Family Heirlooms

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on February 28, 2017

Family mementos belonging to Judith (Foss) Porter

Family treasures belonging to  Judith (Foss) Porter

The East Side History Club presents:

Storytelling Inspired by Family Heirlooms

Saturday, March 18

1-3 pm

Bolz A, Goodman Center, 149 Waubesa St.

$2 suggested donation

Judith Foss Porter, Superintendent of Antique Judging at the McHenry Co. Fair in Woodstock, IL, and daughter of east side business owners Arnold & Sylvia Foss (Foss Grocery, 2001 Atwood) will talk about teasing out the stories that go with family heirlooms. If you have an unusual object and know the story behind it, bring it!

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February 18 meeting: Madison Brass Works History and Future

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on January 19, 2017

Photo by Ann Waidelich

Photo by Ann Waidelich

The East Side History Club presents:

Madison Brass Works History and Future 

Saturday, February 18
1-3 pm
Evjue Room, Goodman Center, 149 Waubesa St.
$2 suggested donation

Beth Miller, Historic Preservation Consultant, Cliff Goodhart, Project Manager, Eppstein Uhen Architects, and Goodman Community Center Communications and Community Director Kristin Groth will talk about the history and future plans for the Madison Brass Works.

Bring your memories of Harry and Betty Vogts and the Waubesa-St. Paul neighborhood to share.

aerial-brassworks-circled

The Madison Brass Works building will become the latest addition to the Goodman Community Center campus.

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Wrapping up: A report on October’s meeting, 4 Generations of the Gunderson Funeral Home

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on November 27, 2016

 

Pete Gunderson, 3rd generation, presented to our club on October 15, 2016.

Pete Gunderson, 3rd generation, presented to our club on October 15, 2016.

Imagine our surprise when Pete Gunderson wheeled in three caskets to the Goodman Community Center for the East Side History Club meeting on October 15th.  He said he would be bringing some historical items for his talk on the history of the Gunderson Funeral Home and on past and current funeral practices but we didn’t expect two full size caskets (one was a beautiful new wicker biodegradable casket and the other was an older traditional Norwegian casket) as well as an historic child’s casket (with a window so people could see the face of the child and not catch whatever communicable disease the child had died from).

3-memorabilia-and-child-casket

Child’s casket with window is visible behind Gunderson Funeral Home memorabilia.

4-norwegian-casket

Traditional Norwegian casket

5-wicker-casket

Modern wicker biodegradable casket

Pete Gunderson is the third generation of Gundersons to be funeral directors on Madison’s East Side, joining the firm in 1982.  Pete’s son, Matt, is the fourth generation.

Pete’s grandparents, Elmer and Inez Gunderson, started the business from their home at 1932 Winnebago St. in 1922. Elmer had been a medic during World War I, transporting and handling the bodies of soldiers who died on the battlefield. After the war, he came to Madison and worked for the funeral director Otto Schroeder on King Street. He decided to attend embalming school so that he could start his own funeral business.

Gunderson residence and first funeral home at 1932 Winnebago Street, Madison.

Gunderson residence and first funeral home at 1932 Winnebago Street, Madison.

In 1926  Elmer and Inez built a beautiful new funeral parlor at 1936 Winnebago Street.

Unfortunately, in 1940, at the age of 45, Elmer died of a heart attack.  His wife Inez had 7 young children to raise (5 daughters, 2 sons) so she went to the Worsham College of Mortuary Science in Chicago and took over the business, involving the children in various tasks until they left home.

Bob Gunderson, Pete’s father, was only 14 years old when his father died.  He helped his mother the best he could until he graduated from East High School in 1944. After serving in WW II and attending the UW he went to the Wisconsin Institute of Mortuary Science in Milwaukee to become a licensed funeral director. Under his and his mother’s leadership, the business thrived.  They built a new facility at 5203 Monona Drive in 1956 and acquiring 6 other funeral homes in the Madison area.

The original Gunderson home and funeral parlor was physically moved from 1936 Winnebago St to 107 Dunning St. in 1956.

The Winnebago Street funeral home continued to be used until the property was sold to Security State Bank for their expansion in 1965.

Inez Gunderson died in 1987 at the age of 91.  She had married Elmer in 1914 and became president of the funeral home after this death and continued until her retirement.

Her son Bob died in 2005 at age 79.  He had been in the business for more than 50 years.

By Ann Waidelich

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Dean Clinic subject brought past employees, patients to November meeting

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on November 16, 2016

On Nov. 12th the East Side History Club heard Bob Kann, (http://www.bobkann.com/  ) talk about the Doctors Dean and the history of the Dean Clinic and the practice of medicine from 1904 through the 1950s.

Bob became interested in the Dean Clinic’s history while researching the history of St. Mary’s Hospital. https://stmarys100stories.wordpress.com/

Dr. Joseph Dean Sr. helped to found St. Mary’s and his brother, two sons and grandson became doctors, in part due to Dr. Dean’s example of unselfish devotion to serving his patients and the community. For more on the history of the Dean Medical Group see  http://www.deancare.com/about-us/history/

The East Madison Clinic became a part of Dean Medical Group in 1982 due in large part to the State’s requirement that medical groups offer a type of health insurance called HMO (Health Maintenance Organization). Rather than form its own the Clinic decided to join the Dean organization.

Attending the November meeting were a group of former employees, including two retired physicians, of the East Madison Clinic who spoke highly of the close working and social relationships that developed at the clinic, due in part to the very small building where it was located.

Dr. Cyrus Reznichek  came to Madison to practice medicine in 1935.  In 1945 he founded the EMC with Drs. Eugene Skroch, R.J. Hennen, and William Meisekothen. They opened their offices in the Simley Building, 2037 Winnebago St.  In 1956 the Clinic built their own building at 1912 Atwood Ave.

The clinic was primarily a general practice clinic but over time they added doctors who were trained in various specialties. By 1969 there were 12 doctors plus staff working under very crowded conditions so the building was enlarged.

It was torn down after the clinic moved to a new, much larger building on 1821 South Stoughton Road in 2004.

img-location-deaneast_lg

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November 12 meeting: History of the Dean Clinic

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on November 4, 2016

East Madison Clinic circa 1980.

East Madison Clinic circa 1980.

The East Side History Club presents:
History of the Dean Clinic
Saturday, November 12
1-3 pm
Evjue Room, Goodman Center, 149 Waubesa St.
$2 suggested donation

Local researcher/author Bob Kann will tell how a one-physician clinic founded in downtown Madison in 1904 grew to more than 60 clinics, a health plan, a foundation, and more. The East Madison Clinic, founded in 1945, merged with Dean Clinic in 1982. Bring your memories of being a patient at the East Madison Clinic.

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October 15 meeting: 4 Generations of the Gunderson Funeral Home

Posted by eastsidehistorymadison on October 13, 2016

The original Gunderson Funeral Home, 1922 on Winnebago Street

 

4 Generations of the Gunderson Funeral Home
Saturday, October 15
1-3 pm in Bolz A
Goodman Center, 149 Waubesa St.
149 Waubesa St.
$2 suggested donation

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